How to Effectively Deal With Concrete

Sometimes, you will realize that the concrete in your house or patio is not good enough as it was before. You can always think about getting it off, so that a new concrete can be poured over, yet the thought of it is actually a very daunting task. It is essential to understand how you can effectively manage all these dilapidated concrete so that you can fully get it off your way. Fact is, there are certain tricks that you can easily follow through so you can effectively engage in such a project.

Keep in mind that as you are starting on such a project of removing the old and dilapidated concrete, you need to see to it that you are equipped with the right materials, and that you are using the necessary safety precaution so that you can successfully do your job.

How to Break and Remove a Concrete Slab

Step 1: Wear Safety Gear

This project will require power tools and you will be working with rough materials, so it’s vital that you wear earplugs, a hard hat, safety goggles and a face mask to protect your mouth and to avoid inhaling substances. You should wear sturdy boots and tough clothing with long sleeves and legs to protect yourself from loose debris. When hiring equipment through hss.com the recommended safety gear will be shown in your basket.

Step 2: Prepare the Area

Make sure there aren’t any water, gas, power or telephone lines nearby or underneath the slab you are breaking up. The area should be completely clear of sticks, leaves, debris, tools, rocks and anything else that may get in your way.

Step 3: Prepare Your Tools

If you are breaking up a slab, you will need an electric heavy-duty breaker to break the concrete. Make sure you have a power outlet or transformer that is able to handle a heavy-duty breaker. This will be offered to you when booking online or recommended in branch when placing your order. You can check the instructions and labels that come with the machine to see what kind of voltage it requires before you purchase or hire it. Directions from manufacturers may also include specific safety precautions you should take as you use the tool.

Step 4: Get your footing

The best way to remove large concrete slabs is to break it up into several smaller pieces. This makes it easier to remove and discard. It is best to start at the side that is farthest away from you so that as you break the concrete, you can stand on the solid, flat concrete that hasn’t been broken yet. It is extremely important that you have a solid place to stand and that you have good footing while you are using the breaker.  Check more details here…

There will be certain instances where the force of nature will come your way as you are preparing on pouring your new set of concrete on your driveway. These severe weather conditions is something that is not alarming, as there are certain tips and tricks that you can do, so that you can easily tackle pouring concrete even on cold weather.

Best Practices for Pouring Concrete in Cold Weather

How the cold affects concrete

The main danger of pouring concrete in the cold is the chance of the concrete freezing before it sets. If this were to happen, the concrete would lose strength, likely becoming unfit for its purpose. Once the concrete has set to a certain strength, it will be able to resist the effects of freezing, no longer being malleable enough to be influenced by the expansion of freezing water.

Before the pour

For concrete, the ambient temperature should be over 5ºC. At this temperature the concrete will be able to set without freezing, though it will take longer to reach its proper strength. If you’re expecting the temperature to be 5ºC or lower at the time of delivery and the pour itself, you will need to take measures to keep it warm.

It’s wise to prepare the pour site well in advance of delivery, and this is especially true in the winter. Take the time to insulate your formwork. Frost blankets will help prevent the subgrade from freezing, so your concrete won’t end up cracking once the subgrade has thawed. You can also use frost blankets once the pour is complete, to help keep the heat in the concrete as it sets.

After the pour

Once the concrete is in place, the period directly after the pour becomes critical. As we’ve said, at around 5ºC, the concrete will take longer to set to a suitable strength. This makes it more important to keep the ambient temperature warm, and not let it drop close to freezing. There will be more chance for the mix to freeze the longer it takes to set, so preventing this is paramount.

For the following two days after the pour, closely monitor the ambient temperature and keep the concrete covered with a frost blanket. The concrete will develop its strength during this time, so keeping it warm gives it the best opportunity to do so unimpeded. Fresh concrete which has frozen during this time will lose significant strength, rendering the pour a failure, so keep exposed surfaces covered and insulated where necessary.

Curing

The curing process is the final step in the concrete’s strength development. You should try to maintain a warm temperature without the concrete drying too rapidly. It’s wise to leave insulated forms in place for as long as possible, and make use of insulated sheets which help keep the concrete at an optimal temperature so as to prevent freezing. Check this out from the main article source at http://www.ekaconcrete.com/news/best-practices-pouring-concrete-cold-weather/.

Concreting is a project that you can do successfully when you are going to plan it well, and when you prepare the necessary equipment that you will use. It would be an important consideration that you check on certain articles that will augment your knowledge on how you can effectively deal with weather disturbances as you wait for your concrete to finally settle.

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